NATIA

Directed by
Anna Parcerisas

Natia's cultural identity is torn when she returns to her country of origin, and discovers an antiquated tradition that dehumanises women is still practised.

Anna Parcerisas is a Barcelona-born award-winning filmmaker based in London who travelled to Georgia, and under the guidance of a Georgian friend, became accustomed to Georgia's culture and traditions, the beautiful and the problematic. The lead character Natia, a 25 year old Georgian who has been away for many years, returns to her hometown and discovers an antiquated tradition which steals the rights away from extremely young women, a tradition that still occurs. The film explores the relationship between the expat and their home country, being both an outsider and an authentic local.

Following the death of her grandfather, 25-year-old Natia returns to Georgia to see her grandmother. Having lived in Europe for many years, Natia sees with fresh eyes — and first hand — the brutal Georgian tradition of bride kidnapping. Angry and stricken, Natia is forced to reassess her culture and her own values.

Parcerisas ¨The story of how I ended up making this short film is quite magical. When I first visited Georgia back in 2016, I felt fascinated and attracted by the country, its people, and its culture.

A friend in London showed me photographs taken in Tbilisi, Georgia, and my intuition and gut feeling led me to pay a visit to this particular Caucasian country a week later. I stayed with a colleague - George, who also works in film. He showed me around Georgia and taught me everything about this intriguing country that most people can’t even locate on a world map.

The reason why I decided to make this film stems from the way Georgia was revealed to me, as though somebody had painted a picture of another world with its alien culture and history.

I heard a compelling account of some Georgian cultural traditions. One of them was bride-kidnapping – men abducting young females and forcing them into marriage.

I set my heart on portraying a new generation of young Georgian women that have to gain control of these circumstances so as to achieve a better future than their previous generation. To put it in a nutshell, we are shown in an artful way how one generation of women is affected by the traditions, actions, and inactions of a previous one¨.

CREDITS

MORE IN

NARRATIVE

MORE IN

NARRATIVE

NATIA

Directed by
Anna Parcerisas

Natia's cultural identity is torn when she returns to her country of origin, and discovers an antiquated tradition that dehumanises women is still practised.

Anna Parcerisas is a Barcelona-born award-winning filmmaker based in London who travelled to Georgia, and under the guidance of a Georgian friend, became accustomed to Georgia's culture and traditions, the beautiful and the problematic. The lead character Natia, a 25 year old Georgian who has been away for many years, returns to her hometown and discovers an antiquated tradition which steals the rights away from extremely young women, a tradition that still occurs. The film explores the relationship between the expat and their home country, being both an outsider and an authentic local.

Following the death of her grandfather, 25-year-old Natia returns to Georgia to see her grandmother. Having lived in Europe for many years, Natia sees with fresh eyes — and first hand — the brutal Georgian tradition of bride kidnapping. Angry and stricken, Natia is forced to reassess her culture and her own values.

Parcerisas ¨The story of how I ended up making this short film is quite magical. When I first visited Georgia back in 2016, I felt fascinated and attracted by the country, its people, and its culture.

A friend in London showed me photographs taken in Tbilisi, Georgia, and my intuition and gut feeling led me to pay a visit to this particular Caucasian country a week later. I stayed with a colleague - George, who also works in film. He showed me around Georgia and taught me everything about this intriguing country that most people can’t even locate on a world map.

The reason why I decided to make this film stems from the way Georgia was revealed to me, as though somebody had painted a picture of another world with its alien culture and history.

I heard a compelling account of some Georgian cultural traditions. One of them was bride-kidnapping – men abducting young females and forcing them into marriage.

I set my heart on portraying a new generation of young Georgian women that have to gain control of these circumstances so as to achieve a better future than their previous generation. To put it in a nutshell, we are shown in an artful way how one generation of women is affected by the traditions, actions, and inactions of a previous one¨.

MORE IN

NARRATIVE