HOMEBOUND

Directed by
Lucy Werrett

FORCED INTO A PERIOD OF REFLECTION, ANONYMOUS VOICES INTIMATELY DETAIL HOW THE UK’S FIRST LOCKDOWN CONFRONTED THEM WITH THEIR INNER DEMONS AND DESIRES

Lucy Werrett is a director and analogue portrait photographer from Bristol. In this experimental documentary, Werrett takes a retrospective look at the collective mental shifts that occurred early last year.

Homebound's narration is a collection of authentic and anonymous voices depicting their experiences within the first lockdown. The voices are all self recorded, and in that way are the perfect reflection of people's new isolation. In the absence of a constant busyness, many go on to analyse and confront their inner demons and desires, connection to mother nature, or fears of the world's foundations, but all describe their change of perspective.

The film builds strong associations between the voices by its use of visuals - choosing strong colour, neon and lighting - and it's sound approach - borrowing sci-fi elements, and electronic hyper surreal notes to reflect the distorted dystopian reality we find ourselves in.


Werrett 'The film started with a two-hour-long phone call with my best friend in the first lockdown. We spoke about the world, our lives and how we were feeling at the time. He was opening up in ways that I’ve never heard him do before. With permission I recorded our conversation and I was so captivated by his reflections and realisations and the rawness that came from him just by listening. We thanked each other for that exchange and this positive call is what inspired the basis of the film. We wanted to capture the same authenticity where people dictate their own reflections and stories and record themselves. The making of the film has been like therapy for me, my producer and my contributors because it felt like we weren’t alone in our struggles. We were connected by being disconnected and it enabled us to process what has happened, see the bigger picture and feel connected to the world around us. The film focused our minds on what truly matters.'

CREDITS

Director @lucy.werrett

Creative Producer @tanyaceebee

Sound Design @_jrhartley

DOP @imtheshit / @jackhayterfilm 

Colourist @adamclarkecolour 

Editor @lucy.werrett

Story Editor @tanyaceebee

Camera @bethanyfitter / @patrickwbethell / @chmiewliski 

VHS @lucy.werrett

Set Dresser @abby_wallace 

Graphics @stayn_aw

Cast @6.9.4 / @bella.gaffney


HOMEBOUND

Directed by
Lucy Werrett

FORCED INTO A PERIOD OF REFLECTION, ANONYMOUS VOICES INTIMATELY DETAIL HOW THE UK’S FIRST LOCKDOWN CONFRONTED THEM WITH THEIR INNER DEMONS AND DESIRES

Lucy Werrett is a director and analogue portrait photographer from Bristol. In this experimental documentary, Werrett takes a retrospective look at the collective mental shifts that occurred early last year.

Homebound's narration is a collection of authentic and anonymous voices depicting their experiences within the first lockdown. The voices are all self recorded, and in that way are the perfect reflection of people's new isolation. In the absence of a constant busyness, many go on to analyse and confront their inner demons and desires, connection to mother nature, or fears of the world's foundations, but all describe their change of perspective.

The film builds strong associations between the voices by its use of visuals - choosing strong colour, neon and lighting - and it's sound approach - borrowing sci-fi elements, and electronic hyper surreal notes to reflect the distorted dystopian reality we find ourselves in.


Werrett 'The film started with a two-hour-long phone call with my best friend in the first lockdown. We spoke about the world, our lives and how we were feeling at the time. He was opening up in ways that I’ve never heard him do before. With permission I recorded our conversation and I was so captivated by his reflections and realisations and the rawness that came from him just by listening. We thanked each other for that exchange and this positive call is what inspired the basis of the film. We wanted to capture the same authenticity where people dictate their own reflections and stories and record themselves. The making of the film has been like therapy for me, my producer and my contributors because it felt like we weren’t alone in our struggles. We were connected by being disconnected and it enabled us to process what has happened, see the bigger picture and feel connected to the world around us. The film focused our minds on what truly matters.'

MORE IN

DOCUMENTARY