FINDING OASIS

Indigo dying in the communities of Isan, Northeast Thailand.

Chomwan Weeraworawit is a Bangkok based filmmaker, and the co-founder of Philip Huang - a sustainably minded lifestyle brand. Weeraworawit was Bangkok-born but has lived in various places from London to Jakarta. Settling in London to study her phd in Intellectual Property and Fashion, focussing on the textiles industry within developing countries, Weeraworawit co-developed Philip Huang to ensure multi collective effort supporting clothe-making and artisan communities in Northeast Thailand. This is her directorial debut.

Finding Oasis, takes the form of a visual essay as it follows Philip Huang’s journey to Isan where we are introduced to the Indigo Grandmas whom he has worked with since his first trip to Isan 5 years ago.

The film visualises the grandmas' shared vision and hears their stories. As the keepers of the indigo-dyeing-craft we're invited into their world where dyeing indigo and weaving are the core to their way of life. Following these craftsmen from dying to the collection of the colour indigo, where it's made, Finding Oasis channels the history of 'the land' and what it means through the lens of a first-generation dyer and designer, Philip Huang.



Huang and Weeraworawit 'We return to the countryside where we discovered indigo and the community that keeps the art of indigo dyeing alive. To us, indigo is a representation of nature and the power of transformation, how leaves and stalks that grow abundantly in the Isan soil and throughout its 6000 year everywhere in the world shows that nature is transformative, able to take different forms, able to thrive in balance and do so in the hand hands of keepers that enable its transformation.'

A visual essay documenting Sakon Nakhon Indigo, directed by Chomwan Weeraworawit with cinematography by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, the acclaimed photographer behind “Call Me By Your Name” and the Palme D’or-winning film “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives”.

CREDITS

Directed by @chomchomw

www.philiphuang.com #philiphuangnyc #findingoasis @philiphuangnyc

Producer: 185 Films, Cattleya Paosrijaroen @beaebeae

Cinematographer: Sayombhu Mukdeeprom #sayombhumukdeeprom

Supervising Editor: Lee Chatametikool @houdinistudio

Sound supervisor: Akritchalerm Kalayanamitr

Post Production: White light post @whitelightpost

Music: Paradise Bangkok Molam International Band @paradisbangkok

Assistant Producer: Phummiphat Suwanananjarern @duke187cm

The film is presented by Philip Huang @philiphuangnyc

FINDING OASIS

Directed by
Chomwan Weeraworawit

Indigo dying in the communities of Isan, Northeast Thailand.

Chomwan Weeraworawit is a Bangkok based filmmaker, and the co-founder of Philip Huang - a sustainably minded lifestyle brand. Weeraworawit was Bangkok-born but has lived in various places from London to Jakarta. Settling in London to study her phd in Intellectual Property and Fashion, focussing on the textiles industry within developing countries, Weeraworawit co-developed Philip Huang to ensure multi collective effort supporting clothe-making and artisan communities in Northeast Thailand. This is her directorial debut.

Finding Oasis, takes the form of a visual essay as it follows Philip Huang’s journey to Isan where we are introduced to the Indigo Grandmas whom he has worked with since his first trip to Isan 5 years ago.

The film visualises the grandmas' shared vision and hears their stories. As the keepers of the indigo-dyeing-craft we're invited into their world where dyeing indigo and weaving are the core to their way of life. Following these craftsmen from dying to the collection of the colour indigo, where it's made, Finding Oasis channels the history of 'the land' and what it means through the lens of a first-generation dyer and designer, Philip Huang.



Huang and Weeraworawit 'We return to the countryside where we discovered indigo and the community that keeps the art of indigo dyeing alive. To us, indigo is a representation of nature and the power of transformation, how leaves and stalks that grow abundantly in the Isan soil and throughout its 6000 year everywhere in the world shows that nature is transformative, able to take different forms, able to thrive in balance and do so in the hand hands of keepers that enable its transformation.'

A visual essay documenting Sakon Nakhon Indigo, directed by Chomwan Weeraworawit with cinematography by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, the acclaimed photographer behind “Call Me By Your Name” and the Palme D’or-winning film “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives”.

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